EVENT

‘Motion to Light’

Snap! Orlando presented 25 international photographers and their interpretation of the concept “Motion to Light”. Before opening night, Snap! hosted three workshops on the idea of Motion, Light, and Motion to Light. Our many thanks to downtown credo, Alex Menendez, Sherri Ferguson Bunye and Brooks Potteiger for this wonderful Conduit Photography Workshop Series.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Stephen Knapp joined us on opening night in conjunction with his light installation at our warehouse space. Stephen has gained an international presence in light painting for large-scale works of art held in museums, public, and private collections, which are executed in media as diverse as light, kiln-formed glass, metal, stone, mosaic, and ceramic.

A beautiful light painted portrait of exhibiting artist photographer Mei Xian Qiu, by Jason Page, at Snap! MOTION TO LIGHT. Jason created 111 light painting portraits during the show!

New York based fashion photographer Aurora Crowley uses light as the painting medium to capture beauty and energy. Originally a hairstylist, he picked up a camera on set, when he felt that photographers weren’t capturing his vision properly. Aurora uses light sources to overlay slick, artistic lines over his models, visually expressing his interpretation of how energy is everywhere and exists in everything.

Patrick Rochon, Light Painter from the new series "Exodeus, Divine Beauty, Divine Light," a collaboration between Rochon and beauty artist Deva.

Jeff Frost (Snap! 2013, MOTION TO LIGHT featured artist and guest speaker) was selected by Lincoln Motor Company to be included in the “Hello, Again” film series in which filmmakers are asked to reimagine the familiar into something fresh and new. Frost started to make his film on life in a fallen tree. Frost dedicated this film to his friend, Steave, who recently lost his battle to cancer.

Jay Mark Johnson's photographs may look like photoshop experiments, but they are images taken straight from a slit camera used for capturing vast landscapes. The camera captures light through a small slit in its rotating head, effectively exposing the image slowly from one side to the other. With still landscapes this registers as a normal image, but in Johnson’s work which feature moving subjects, the unique result captures both space and time. Because he has rigged the camera to move at nearly the same speed as his moving subjects, they are recorded as still and recognizable images in a moving background of streaked color. In these images we are not simply seeing left to right, but in fact left is the past and right is the future.

Martin Stranka, over the past three years, has won 40 major international photography awards including 'Professional Photographer of the Year', 'Nikon International Emerging Talent Award', 'Sony World Photography Awards' and 'EISA Photo Maestro.' Featured Work: "Between Light & Nowhere"

Jay Mark Johnson's photographs are images taken straight from a slit camera used for capturing vast landscapes. The camera captures light through a small slit in its rotating head, effectively exposing the image slowly from one side to the other. With still landscapes this registers as a normal image, but in Johnson’s work which features moving subjects, the unique result captures both space and time.

Christy Lee Rogers's images resemble Baroque paintings examining the chiaroscuro qualities of light. Using water as a medium for breaking the conventions of contemporary photography, her subjects bend and distort; bathing in darkness, isolated by light, and brought to life by one's own imagination. Featured work: "Some Day I'll Fly Away"

Szymon Brodziak, who has obtained many international awards for his work, also showcased his first book project "Naughty Girls" at Snap! Fashion Night, during Snap!’s Motion to Light.

Cedric Arnold's "Sacred Ink" was photographed over a period of four years and comprises a series of portraits and ceremonial images documenting Thailand’s spiritual tattoo tradition. "Sacred Ink" exhibit debuted at Rooftop Gallery, Bangkok in November 2012.

Photographer Kerry Skarbakka joined us on opening night and was a guest speaker at our salon talk! In his photographic self-portrait series, Kerry captures himself in moments of suspended peril: falling from trees, tumbling head over heels in painfully precarious falls, slipping nude in the shower, or teetering on the edge of a fateful leap from a railway bridge. Skarbakka refers to human existence as a process of perpetual falling, and the responsibility of each person to catch ourselves from our own uncertainty.

Jim Kazanjian’s surreal landscapes offer phantasmagoric visions of a where-is-this world, defined by impossibly complex architecture and M.C. Escher-esque black-and-white graphics. Inspired by the imaginary realms of cult author H.P. Lovecraft – whose wild, cosmic short stories set the mold for much of the 20th century’s best science fiction – Kazanjian’s aim is to redress the “misunderstanding that photography has a kind of built-in objectivity.”

Astonishing 9 year-old activist Vivienne Harr from California attended our Motion to Light Opening, as we celebrated the First Year Anniversary of her Make A Stand Lemon-Aid movement! Harr was inspired to take action after seeing a photo, by Lisa Kristine, of two Nepalese children holding hands while carrying giant slate rocks with straps across their heads. Vivienne began selling lemonade (300 days to date, so far!) to end child slavery. Vivienne has raised awareness worldwide, and over $400,000 in less than a year!

Snap! Orlando - 1427 A Alden Drive, Orlando 32803

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